Private Virtue, Our Only Hope

Private Virtue, Our Only Hope

Holistic Management

The American Founders were students of history. They observed that all life (especially political life) tends toward decay and entropy. From Nebuchadnezzar’s Siege of Jerusalem to to the fall of Rome, Nature’s tendency to corrode and degenerate has been stable and accountable. Energy, however, is the opposing force to entropy–the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

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Food Forest Implementation: Hügelkultur Beds

Food Forest Implementation: Hügelkultur Beds

Permaculture

A Hügelkultur bed is extremely simple to build in theory: pile dirt on top of forest-related and currently decomposing organic matter. As time progresses, the deep soil of the Hügelkultur bed grows in fertility, as its rich organic matter—teeming with soil life—breaks down the woody materials. This decaying process forces the wood to shrink, causing three great long-term benefits.

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Mary Oliver: A Rain Rising

Mary Oliver: A Rain Rising

Holistic Management

The last cigar I smoked was in a room full of books. It was a Romeo y Julieta and it was insufferable. The cigar’s light kept failing, for I was too focused on the room and the moment. There are days in a man’s life that, looking back, he wishes he would have showered for; days that, had he known before it’s sun rose, he would have donned his best and walked lightly through it.

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How to Grow a Blueberries in a Temperate Climate Successfully

How to Grow a Blueberries in a Temperate Climate Successfully

Permaculture

Blueberries can be one of the most low-maintenance and pleasurable berries to grow in the temperate permaculture homestead. They are incredibly long-lived plants, ranging from 30-50 years and contain phytonutrients called polyphenols, which not only give these berries their deep blue colours but help decrease inflammation in the human body as well.

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Minerals and Natural Instincts

Minerals and Natural Instincts

Holistic Management

Our farm’s intense dedication to animal nutrition began the third day after our cattle arrived. We spent the previous weeks preparing their paddocks, running water lines, cleaning up fences, and sourcing minerals (salt, a balanced mineral mix, and kelp).

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Adaptive Epigenetics by Rewilding Livestock

Adaptive Epigenetics by Rewilding Livestock

Holistic Management

Our farm’s interest in wild breeding—or rewilding our livestock—began during a winter blizzard. Standing outside in the snow and covered in freezing mud, my wife, Morgan, and I were trying to calm down our bull.

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